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How To Grow Afro Textured Hair Long and Strong

How To Grow Afro Textured Hair Long and Strong

Growing your afro textured can no doubt be challenging, but by no means is it impossible. Some of the common challenges these African hair textures face are: Split ends and breakage with improper care Naturally dry texture Highly delicate texture despite it’s natural appearance Frequent chemical over processing Did you know that kinky, coily and highly curly hair grows an average of 1.27cm per month? That’s an average of 15 cm a year of growth! So how do you grow kinky, coiled and curly hair long and strong? Follow these tips and you won’t go wrong. Remember that the ends of your hair are the oldest and most delicate, so keep them moisturized. As well as split end free and tucked away from damage Use less heat on your hair. Limit your hair’s exposure to heat to 4 or less times a year Alternate weekly between deep conditioning treatments and moisture and protein to keep your hair moisturized and strong Give your hair a much-needed break by utilizing protective styles such as braids, weaves and wigs Stretch your chemical treatments to 8-10 weeks or longer if your can manage. This will prevent over processing and damage to the hair. Stay away from combs with small teeth, and brushes with rough bristles. Opt for a wide toothcomb for detangling. Moisturize your African hair nightly with a water-based moisturizer. Keep your root nourished with natural oils like, Coconut Oil, Shea Butter, Olive Oil and Castor Oil. Cut split ends in order to keep your hair healthy. Always use hair scissors and not kitchen scissors. Protect your delicate strands from your cotton...
Moisturizing Natural Hair

Moisturizing Natural Hair

Moisturizing is an absolutely no-miss part of maintaining healthy afro textured hair. The main reason for this is the structure of the hair shaft. Unlike Caucasian hair (see chart below) which is generally straighter, sebum isn’t able to travel from our scalp (where it’s produced) down the individual shaft as easily on its own. As a result, we need to step in & make moisturising a regular part of a healthy haircare regime. The tighter the curl, the more difficulty sebum has getting down the shaft to the ends. Hence, the drier the hair has the potential to be. The above hair, “typing system” was invented by Andre Walker, Oprah’s stylist. Though ongoing local research & development here in SA, led by Professor Nonhlanhla Khumalo, Head of Dermatology at UCT & Groote Schuur, suggests we may have as many as 8, not 4, hair types in SA. When it comes to colouring afro textured hair, colour presents an interesting way to change your look. Whether you want to go jet black, blonde or add highlights it is always exciting. Things to keep in mind if you’re considering colouring your kinky(remove word)/curly hair: Do your research. Consult friends and family or local natural hair forums like South African Naturals for tips from personal experience. If your hair is already in a bad state (breakage, hairline issues etc.) it’s best to address those before colouring. Do a patch test. Follow application instructions closely and if you’re unsure, get in touch with the manufacturer. Coloured hair needs more TLC in terms of maintenance. So if you’re super busy or just lazy with...
Tips For Healthy Hair

Tips For Healthy Hair

Our healthy hair is a huge part of who we are. We make a statement through how we wear it even if this might not be the intention. Whether we have a standing theme going on or whether we change it with season. There is always more to it than just its length, shape, texture and colour. Coco Chanel understood this very well when she said: “A woman who cuts her hair is about to change her life”. “Your hair is the ball gown that you never take off” – Jo Robertson, Head of UK & Roi Education, GHD. We’ve all heard the saying “you are what you eat”. So likewise, gorgeous and healthy hair is a result of a healthy lifestyle. Neglecting one’s health may lead to breakage, brittleness and even hair loss. That is what Nutritional Therapist, Jo Lewin says. A diet rich in proteins will do your hair a lot of good. Regular excise is important. A lifestyle full of fats, bad cholesterol and carbs will strip your skin and hair of its natural oils and beauty. Get enough rest and consume alcohol only in moderation. Drinking, smoking and inadequate sleep can all affect how your hair looks and feels. Avoid hot air drying or ironing your hair too often; this makes hair weak and brittle. Limit your hair drying and ironing to once a week. Most importantly, get to know your hair; it’s similar to getting to know your skin type. What works for the next person might not work for you. With the rising number of women opting to keep their hair natural, ethnic...
Winter Hairstyles

Winter Hairstyles

As the bitter cold and dry winter sweeps this part of the world it’s time for new hairstyles. And it’s all about protecting your strands against excessive dryness. Protecting the ends and ensuring your hair stays hydrated. Therefore retaining as much moisture as possible when you choose a hairstyle. Braids and Twists Braiding or twisting our kinks is an ancient practice and continues to be a favourite, especially in winter. Twisting protect hair against cold and wind, while giving it a break from frequent manipulation. It doesn’t hurt chunky braids and kinky twists with extensions are so on trend this winter. But short mini kinky twist hairstyles also look great. Crochet Braids A great hairstyle option for winter. You can either use textured hair for a fuller and more natural look or straight hair. The Weave Not as common anymore, but a weave is a great way of changing things up. Doing so without altering your natural hair, keeping it protected underneath. Add Some Colour Adding colour to your hair can be a great way of changing things up this winter. To colour African kinky hair, use a trusted brand that won’t turn your colouring experience into a hair tragedy. Don’t colour your hair too light if you have naturally dark hair. Twist Outs and Braid Outs Great low manipulation natural African hairstyles that can be worn in between long protective styles or exclusively. Adding as much moisture as possible is key to keep the strands hydrated and less prone to split ends & breakage. All Up Hairstyle Pinned updo’s and buns are a great way to keep hair...
Split Ends

Split Ends

I complained about split ends in my last post so I decided to do a bit of research about what causes them and how I could minimise or possibly eliminate them. Split ends are the splitting / fraying of the hair shaft. They cannot be repaired though there are products that can seal them split temporarily. Split ends are also called trichoptilosis. The causes of split ends can be divided into thermal, chemical or mechanical. Thermal This is through the use of excessive heat through heat tools like flat irons and curling irons. Chemical The use of chemicals like relaxers and hair colour can make hair prone to split ends. Mechanical Excessive combing and general rough handling. This also covers hair tools and accessories that can contribute to the problem by snagging or tearing the hair. How to prevent / minimise split ends Minimise the use of heat Keep the use of heat to an absolute minimum. Regular use heat tools can cause damage. When you do use heat tools make sure to use a heat protectant to protect the hair. Whenever you can let the hair air dry. If you want the curls loosened, air dry the hair in twists or a braid. Threading can also be used to stretch the hair. Low manipulation of the hair Cut down on constant combing and brushing. You can also dry your hair with an old tshirt rather than a towel which can be harsh / rough on the hair. Also guard against friction of the hair on fabrics eg collars, coats etc. Careful use of hair accessories Avoid hair accessories that snag...
Helpful tips for your baby locks

Helpful tips for your baby locks

First, congratulations on taking the journey to dreadlock your hair! It’s such an exciting journey that will hopefully be a long and beautiful one. Unfortunately, the journey doesn’t start of all happy and beautiful. It takes quite of bit of patience and know-how in order to keep at the process. He are a few of my ethnic hair care tips for your baby locks. Cleansing: Cleansing your scalp can be a bit difficult with baby locks. You need to keep your scalp and hair free of debris, but you also don’t want your locks to unravel. Try diluting your favourite sulphate free shampoo with water in an applicator bottle, squeeze the mixture directly onto your scalp and massage gently into your scalp. Take another applicator bottle with plain water and rinse the scalp throughly. Alternatively, you could skip the shampoo and opt for an apple cider vinegar rinse to gently remove product build-up. Hot Oil Treatments Are Your Friend: I’m not a fan of conditioner for dreadlocks. Because locks are basically matted hair, I find that using thick substances on the hair that do not eventually penetrate into the hair just leaves a ton of build-up. Conditioner is really hard to rinse completely out of locks, so I recommend using a hot oil treatment in place of conditioner. A hot olive oil treatment is great for moisture, while a hot coconut oil treatment is excellent for keeping your locks strong. Say No To Towels: I tell everyone to not use towels on their hair, regardless of hair type, but in this case it isn’t about breakage from a cotton...